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Credit: City of Rochester

Credit: City of Rochester

 

Rochester area blacks and Hispanics are lagging behind whites in employment and income, with Hispanics faring slightly better than blacks. That’s according to the National Urban League’s annual State of Black America 2014 report.

Rochester ranked 59th of 77 metropolitan areas on black and white unemployment. Rochester has 18 percent black unemployment versus 6.9 percent white unemployment. 

Rochester ranked 64 out of 77 metros on black and white median household income. Black households earn $27,210. White households earn more than twice as much –  $55,002.

On Hispanic and white unemployment, Rochester ranked 77th out of 83 metros. Hispanic unemployment is 14.5 percent, compared to 6.9 percent white unemployment.

Rochester ranked 71st out of 83 metros on Hispanic and white income equality, with Hispanic households earning $30,486 compared to $55,002 for white households.

Nationally, black unemployment is 13.1 percent and Hispanic unemployment is 9.1 percent, compared to 6.5 percent for whites.

Here in the United States, our story is rife with examples indicating that despite being fve years out of the Great Recession, we have yet to realize a great recovery. Instead, what we see emerging is indisputable clarity of what I refer to as “The Great Divide.” Whether it is termed income inequality, loss of social mobility, the eroding middle class or opportunity inequality, at its core is a great divide between the people who have homes, secure jobs, savings and retirement and the people who have only some—or worse yet, none—of these.

– Marc H. Morial, President & CEO of National Urban League

 

Links of the Day:

 

– Segregation in Buffalo schools has returned to 1970s levels.

– Rochester area schools are hiring more social workers, as children come to school with more and more problems related to poverty.

– Albany immigrants are increasingly settling in the suburbs. (Also true in Rochester.)

– Turning a Catholic church in Syracuse into a mosque has been controversial.

– Who’s on the short list to buy the Buffalo Bills? A man most Rochesterians have never heard of.

– A man is opening an egg factory in Ohio. He has good-paying jobs available. He can’t find people to fill them.

 

Tweets of the Day:

 

 

 

9 Responses to Blacks, Hispanics Behind in Jobs, Income

  1. April 6, 2014 at 12:05 pm theodore kumlander responds:

    Perhaps people prefer segregation.

    Desegregation was an experiment with the best of intentions to improve American society.

    The people have rejected Desegregation, in every city in America. perhaps the people are right?

    • I agree. People will tend to associate with people of similar likes. They share the same customs, food, music, clothes, language, etc. Forcing people to do otherwise will NEVER work. I don’t think color has as much to do with it as the media or activists make it out to be. Just my thoughts….

    • wat

  2. April 6, 2014 at 12:38 pm Orielly responds:

    “Nationally, black unemployment is 13.1 percent and Hispanic unemployment is 9.1 percent, compared to 6.5 percent for whites.

    Here in the United States, our story is rife with examples indicating that despite being five years out of the Great Recession, we have yet to realize a great recovery. Instead, what we see emerging is indisputable clarity of what I refer to as “The Great Divide.” Whether it is termed income inequality, loss of social mobility, the eroding middle class or opportunity inequality, at its core is a great divide between the people who have homes, secure jobs, savings and retirement and the people who have only some—or worse yet, none—of these.

    – Marc H. Morial, President & CEO of National Urban League

    Did anyone think to ask Mr. Morial who he voted for president in 2008 or 1012? Did any of the reporters think to ask who the National Urban League endorsed for President in 2008 and 2012?

    Funny how reporters, report but never think to ask the question that would uncover the responsibility factor.

    Takes a lot of Gall to expose and complain about minority unemployment rates and lack of gains over the last 5 yrs when the candidate, person and party your organization pushed and endorsed won and has now failed you and your people.

    It is also glaring that no reporter thought it a reasonable question to ask who the complainer (Urban League) endorsed for election?

    Kinda like Locally we have the countless complaints, speeches and letters, by Jennifer Leonard CEO of RCF (260K salary) and her Husband (100K+ income) living in Brighton, now weekly complaining in the D&C and on TV, about income inequality and despising the segregation of the rich and poor into geographically segregated separate areas.

    Did any reporter think to ask them when they will be leading by example, and moving to the urban mixed-race lifestyle of say the 10th or 3rd ward? Or when Ms Leonard and her husband will donate all or most of their salaries, much coming from non-profit contributions, so that they can lead and have a greater understanding of what it is like to live on say 30K a year?

    When will a reporter, challenge theses complainers to walk the walk vs their constant talk the talk?

    • I firmly believe that “poor” is a BUSINESS. Just think of how many jobs would be lost if we did not have “poor”. The Democratic party would be NOTHING if we didn’t have “poor”. The Urban League would not exist if we didn’t have “poor”. Al Sharpton would not be rich if we didn’t have “poor”. All the other non-profits and social agencies with their high salaried CEO’s would not exist without “poor”. “POOR” is here to stay until the media exposes it for what it is. Ironically, the media needs “poor” also to provide great stories. What a mess we are in.

    • April 7, 2014 at 8:11 am Animule responds:

      It should be noted that the mission statement for the “Rochester Area Community Foundation” says absolutely nothing about solving problems like poverty that it professes to address with its quarter billion dollars in assets. The focus is on creating a “permanent endowment” that guarantees the principals of these organizations won’t have to seek real jobs in a competitive marketplace anytime soon. Here is the group’s mission statement, from its 990 filing: “To build a permanent community endowment that meets the current and changing needs of this region through creative and effective philanthropy.”

  3. As person who has worked for a local company for over 20 years, I can totally understand these statistics. As a Hispanic male I have been in my position for over 15 years and others who have started below me are now above me. I have hired folks for entry level positions and years later, they are at the same level as me or higher. I have had many good reviews and have excelled in my position. I have been involved with assembling training manuals for my position and I have had the opportunity to do 2 special projects. My bosses could not be more impressed with my performance and ease of which I picked up on these jobs. These positions were temporary, but due to my performance, I anticipated doing something different to help further my career. This did not happen because there was a need for my experience at my former position, thus I was placed in the same area, again. Is it discrimination? I tell myself all the time I don’t think so, but me being a “company person” I do what’s asked. Where does it stop? Should I feel slighted by my lack of progression in this company? You feel trapped and you say to yourself how do you approach this? Talk to management? They will deflect and say speak to your direct report. Speak to Human resources? Again, deflection. Acquire a mentor who is of a higher position? Great idea, initially, but ultimately they are out for themselves. I can’t be about myself in the work force. That is not fair to everyone else I work with. Maybe I should be more selfish. Or is there more? Maybe it is race, not too many higher up management folks in this company who are of Latin decent. I don’t know anymore.

  4. April 7, 2014 at 4:30 pm Ted Farley responds:

    There are many clubs out there to prepare African Americans for success. The problem is getting participation which falls upon the shoulders of parents. I work with a man who is part of the African American young men’s association but complains of limited participation. The big question is how if we change that?

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