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Links of the Day:

- Here we are again. Gas prices are on the way up. In Rochester, we’re paying $3.82 a gallon, up 36 cents in last year.

The Buffalo News reports:

As the price at the pump continues its steady rise, expect ride-sharing, public transportation and fuel-efficient vehicles to become more popular — as they did during previous price hikes.

But people here are reliant on their cars, and drivers tend to go back to their old, gas-gulping habits when prices go down again in the fall.

However, experts say we could see $4.50-per-gallon gas here — and $5 per gallon in the most expensive cities in the country.

And those record prices could be a catalyst for real change in our national motor-vehicle network, easing the way for cars powered by electricity, natural gas or other alternatives.

“When you get to $4.50 a gallon, the math [on a hybrid car] works,” said Tony Daily, general manager of the Towne Automotive Group. “At $3 a gallon, it doesn’t.”

In Monroe County, 7 percent of workers carpool and 2 percent take public transportation, according to the Census. The number of carpoolers has been dropping. In 1980 15 to 20 percent of us carpooled.

Do you see that changing if gas prices get to a certain level? The trend over the last 30 years says no.

- Yet another column in the Wall Street Journal about Kodak knocks Rochester:

Its digital imaging division, locked up in its headquarters in Rochester, always appeared to be under pressure to create synergies between film and digital. But doing digital from Rochester was always going to be a challenge.

- What’s the future of the telecommunications industry? One expert compares it to rise and fall of the railroad industry. Rochester is a mini-telecom hub, so it’s worth paying attention to this sector.

- The old “Hello Rochester” 13WHAM commercial that ran in the Oscars was a big hit. You can find more vintage stuff on the station’s Creative Services web page.

- What’s a news station to do when it has cellphone video of a mayor playfully slapping a woman’s butt?

10 Responses to Will You Change Driving Habits?

  1. February 27, 2012 at 11:45 am Jim Webster responds:

    Of course, as much as possible. Work demands must be met, but shopping trips, etc. will be co-ordinated.
    As fuel prices rise, the drain on our economy becomes monumental. But hopefully that will stimulate even more work on alternative enengy forms.

  2. Not particularly. Even out in the Penfield suburbs, I bike to most of my errands.

    I have a fond hope that as more people need to choose alternate methods of transportation, they’ll become more aware of how ridiculous some of their driving choices have been.

  3. February 27, 2012 at 12:26 pm James Simons responds:

    It is hard for Rochester to adapt too much because of our poor transit system. Between RGRTA’s ridiculous hub-and-spoke bus system and zero political leadership with the guts to push rail transit we are pretty much out of luck. There is absolutely no reason why this area can’t support some form of rail transit. At the very least connecting downtown with the airport, RIT and U of R. Despite what people think, Rochester does have the density to support light rail.

    Other smaller communities are jumping ahead of us and see the opportunity. Kenosha, Wisconsin with a city population under 100k and a metro population under 200k has developed a street car line that plays off the city’s historic street cars. Rochester is a metro of over a million people yet outside passionate groups like Rocsubway, Reconnect Rochester and others there is little push for it. Ludicrous!

  4. February 27, 2012 at 1:17 pm tony mittiga responds:

    One reason for the decline in car pooling is the change in how local businesses are organized. Instead of 100s, thousands, and,even 10s of thousands working at the huge factories, and more dense downtown, of the past, most workers now travel to smaller, more scattered sites.
    I’d like to know how light rail is working in Buffalo, and why the Ontrac experiment failed in Syracuse, before considering the experience of more distant cities.

    • The Main St. rail line in BUF is bankrupting the rest of the NFTA. It’s long N_S single line architecture in a colonial radial avenue context was a massive failure from day one.

      In a radial avenue system, Like ROC, a single rail line is minimized because getting to it from turf outside walking distances to stations cause light use:

      1.because bus systems often disregard cross-town routes in a radial ave. pattern.
      2.If you have to get in a car to get to a station, you just as well might take a radial ave. and go all the way to your destination, especially if it’s mid ropute on the linear rail route or cross town or about the terminus of the rail route.
      3.The construction of the route, esprcially thru established residential and strip ave. commercial district will destroy the neighborhhods in those districts, as the underground portions did in BUF.

      ROC almost did what BUF did with the old proposal for a SE to NW diagonal rail line from Riverton to Rochester Products. The result would have been the same as BUF.

      New proposals to somehow incorporate the Amtrak Sta. and a new downtown bus terminal ignores the massive infrastructure that would have to be dealt with crossing the tracks, river and private properties to tie the systems together.

      Better would have been some kind of re-use of the old trolly system which was pedicated on interlaced diagonal rail line integrated with bus lines and traveling neighborhoods who actually had some convenience offered to them for their everyday lives (Park Ave & mid-rise apt. building near old stations as well as street retail commercial near stations, with ternimals at major employment locales.)

      In their wisdom, the City has gone off and sold or filled key parts of the old subway R.O.W.s. Gee, they must be singing from a different hymnal book.

    • The Main St. rail line in BUF is bankrupting the rest of the NFTA. It’s long N_S single line architecture in a colonial radial avenue context was a massive failure from day one.

      In a radial avenue system, Like ROC, a single rail line is minimized because getting to it from turf outside walking distances to stations cause light use:

      1.because bus systems often disregard cross-town routes in a radial ave. pattern.
      2.If you have to get in a car to get to a station, you just as well might take a radial ave. and go all the way to your destination, especially if it’s mid ropute on the linear rail route or cross town or about the terminus of the rail route.
      3.The construction of the route, esprcially thru established residential and strip ave. commercial district will destroy the neighborhhods in those districts, as the underground portions did in BUF.

      ROC almost did what BUF did with the old proposal for a SE to NW diagonal rail line from Riverton to Rochester Products. The result would have been the same as BUF.

      New proposals to somehow incorporate the Amtrak Sta. and a new downtown bus terminal ignores the massive infrastructure that would have to be dealt with crossing the tracks, river and private properties to tie the systems together.

      Better would have been some kind of re-use of the old trolly system which was pedicated on interlaced diagonal rail line integrated with bus lines and traveling neighborhoods who actually had some convenience offered to them for their everyday lives (Park Ave & mid-rise apt. building near old stations as well as street retail commercial near stations, with terminals at major employment locales.)

      In their wisdom, the City has gone off and sold or filled key parts of the old subway R.O.W.s. Gee, they must be singing from a different hymnal book.

  5. R, thanks for bringing us this article because it’s “right on.”

    I lived in the 10th Ward, in the shadow of The Park. At the corner of Dewey and West Ridge was Kodak’s film development drop box which, it was said, would develope your film in Kodak mailer envelopes on the same day as deposit.

    There was a huge assembly line developement operation in the building at which many folks from around the 10th would work at, especially if they had a relative to refer them thru the Kodak personnel offices and you didn’t have a vowel at the end of your name.

    I had a dear friend who worked there on 35mm batch processing and told me one most oft repeated personal family pic was the kids sitting on the potty.

    Now think of that and how digital cameras have eliminated that dear Kodak moment and subs an immediate upload to FB or twitter w/o Big Yellow making a dime.

    This WP article has all the main points of the K demise in one place. Took a while for someone to do it.

  6. R, thanks for bringing us this article because it’s “right on.”

    I lived in the 10th Ward, in the shadow of The Park. At the corner of Dewey and West Ridge was Kodak’s film development drop box which, it was said, would develope your film in Kodak mailer envelopes on the same day as deposit.

    There was a huge assembly line developement operation in the building at which many folks from around the 10th would work at, especially if they had a relative to refer them thru the Kodak personnel offices and you didn’t have a vowel at the end of your name.

    I had a dear friend who worked there on 35mm batch processing and told me one most oft repeated personal family pic was the kids sitting on the potty.

    Now think of that and how digital cameras have eliminated that dear Kodak moment and subs an immediate upload to FB or twitter w/o Big Yellow making a dime.

    This WSJ article has all the main points of the K demise in one place. Took a while for someone to do it.

  7. I sure wish people would change their driving habits and walk more. If they did, they would value the world from the pedestrian’s view of life. This would push them to support different initiatives and fund different projects. And, resent research shows a growing value on ‘walkability.’ There is already a huge amount of data on the health benefits of walking more. But if you are in your car all the time, it just won’t be your priority :-(

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